Revolutionizing Food Sustainability

BY GEORGE CHAI, CONTRIBUTOR

The type and quality of food we choose to eat determine how healthy we humans are. As individuals, we are surrounded by different foods, yet the lack of sustainability within different societies damages both our bodies and environment. Therefore, it is imperative that governments reform and change the way we access and eat food. Fortunately, the sustainable food movement is doing just that.

In the last 30 years, food prices for major commodities have been inching high. The United Nations elucidates that this rise is due to increasing energy prices, a lack of investment within the agricultural sector, an increasing demand for food, and environmental decline. This, unfortunately, affects food security. Right now, over 860 million people are afflicted by chronic hunger. Hunger will lead to an additional 100 million people into poverty.

Let’s break down the parts of the sustainable food movement section by section. The first initiative is more precise farming. This is a simple yet effective way farmers can deploy their crops. Progress in science and other technologies have helped increase efficacy within the agricultural sector by notifying farmers where and when to fertilize and plant their crops. Secondly, better organic farming techniques have been used in different locations. For example, specific practices have been developed to preserve water and improve the quality of the soil utilized by farmers. Thirdly, farmers have started to use more agrobiologicals. Seed products that contain natural plant extracts and microbes have been replacing many agrochemicals in the industry. Finally, societies have started to integrate genetically modified organisms, or GMOs, into their diets. While debate still exists over long-term health ramifications, it is hard to deny the increase in productivity GMOs are responsible for. The Council for Science and Technology reports that GMOs will supplement the diets of 9 billion people living on Earth.

Although necessary, improving technology in agriculture is not going to solve our problems. It is essential for all governments to make an effort to create political reform and also for societal change in general. The sustainable movement is still picking up steam, but increasing its footprint across the international world. It’s time to make concerted change to the world we live in; it’s time to join the movement.